The European Parliament then expressed concern about the lack of clear intergovernmental agreements guaranteeing common air navigation services across the continent. In 1979, EUROCONTROL signed a cooperation agreement with the European Commission to create synergy between EUROCONTROL`s technical know-how and EU regulators. Several initiatives that have emerged during this period are an integral part of the organization, such as the EUROCONTROL forecasting service, which became STATFOR, as well as the aeronautical information service. In 1986, the pressure on the European ATC network was such that a new, broader mandate was already envisaged for EUROCONTROL, much of which came from the ECAC transport ministers. Subsequently, ECAC invited all its member States to join EUROCONTROL. [5] Letters of compliance set out the high-level policy on cooperation between States in the event of an emergency and may include both operational and technical assistance. A revised EUROCONTROL Convention was signed in 1997, which renewed the Organisation`s optimism for increased political support and went beyond the original vision of the 1960 Convention. In June 1998, Eurocontrol, the European Space Agency (ASE) and the European Commission (EC) also signed an agreement forming cooperation in the field of satellite navigation systems and services. In 1999, the European Commission presented its Single European Sky (SES) Plan to the European Parliament, followed by two High Level Groups (HRMs). The GHS reports on SES led to the creation of the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) and strengthened the role of the European Commission as the sole European aviation safety regulatory authority, while recognising EUROCONTROL`s technical expertise in the implementation of these rules. [5] In 2011, in the interests of efficiency and safety, the CRCO set up a new programme for lessors and financiers, allowing electronic access to route charges, provided that the applicant party submits a letter of authorisation from the operator in a format established by EUROCONTROL (a „letter of authorisation“).

Since then, we have learned that the CRCO is extremely strict in accepting letters submitted with the slightest deviation from the prescribed format. The real problem for donors and financiers is that there are often used structures that do not take into account the prescribed format, and EUROCONTROL has only provided informal advice on how to deal with these situations successfully. The prescribed form of the letter of authorization provides for direct leasing from the lessor to the operator and does not contain any proposals to change the form of multi-layer leasing structures, such as lead purchase agreements or interchange agreements. However, there is an informal agreement with the CRCO, which has developed since the adoption of the 2011 directive on how to submit letters of authorisation for such structures. . . .